Who Does Holla Serve?

Who Does Holla Serve?

Archie Boone Jr.

http://www.hollainc.net

12/10/2021

Description of the needs of people HOLLA Inc. serves.

HOLLA Inc. targets youth from impoverished communities due to high concentration of low Socioeconomic Status, high risk factors among disparity groups. Programs and services offered provide a bridge access chasm, dispels stigmas, and assist youth in securing a promising narrative.

Based upon the 2017 HUD Census report Norfolk Redevelopment and Housing Authority (NRHA) public housing communities are host to a high concentration of impoverished families in the city. 82% of NRHA public housing residents are homes where the Head of Household is African American. The average annual income in NRHA communities is $11,880 with 75% of those families classified as having extremely low income.

Substance abuse is common among the parents and youth in many localities. Poorer areas see use of alcohol and illegal drugs; wealthier areas report abuse of prescription drugs. The Opioid Epidemic and COVID-19 Pandemic have brought forth new findings in disparate populations. Towards these public health emergencies, HOLLA Inc. responds to address underlying issues that have an impact on social determinants of health for youth and their parents.

Services to address these needs are greatly lacking, particularly for the youth. “[Our area doesn’t] have affordable, available, adolescent substance abuse programs,” said a director of a behavioral health service.

HOLLA Inc. serves children who have been removed from their homes, who have been in the foster care system, who have seen substance abuse, whose parents are incarcerated. Crime also affects children indirectly in many ways. “Crime reduces access to parks and stops kids from being able to play outside [safely],” said a community health supervisor, “and the neighborhood affects their image of themselves and their choices.”

In 2018, Virginia Social Indicator Dashboard shows that Norfolk had an alarming rate of need for prevention services for youth and their families. Norfolk ranked #1 for the highest crack cocaine (drug narcotic) arrests in the state, #8 for cocaine, and #10 for heroin. Based on reports of fentanyl overdoses from Office of Chief Medical Examiner, Norfolk ranked #2 out of 40 communities, #9 of 40 for heroin, and #10 of 40 for cocaine. As for Juvenile Cases, Norfolk ranks #2 of 40 for direct care, and #3 of 40 for intake cases. Up by nearly 300 cases in 2015, Norfolk City had 2391 intake cases in 2017(Department of Juvenile Justice). In 2016, Norfolk City had 372 cocaine cases and 6.33 cocaine overdoses (DFS). Norfolk’s Child Poverty rate in 2018 is 31.22. That’s 8.22% increase since 2014 (Department of Social Services).

In 2014, nearly 35% of Norfolk residents were living in poverty. That’s a 25% higher rate than neighboring cities like Chesapeake and Virginia Beach. Norfolk’s high number of juvenile case (intake) during this year 2015, clearly validates the risk to the city’s youth as being prone to risky behaviors. Throughout key informant interviews certain themes arose which included:

• Norfolk, as an urban center for the Hampton Roads region, has a much more prevalent and visible substance use issue than in neighboring cities;

• Needs identified to expand substance abuse prevention and treatment;

• Community awareness and interest in addressing substance abuse stems from related crime and a desire for safety in neighborhoods;

• The hospitals see a lot of patients with substance use issues and are more proactively involved;

• Most all families are touched by this issue somehow in a personal manner;

• There is increasing understanding that substance use affects people from all socioeconomic classes and races; however, some misconceptions still exist within the general population.

Child and neglect were identified in all three data sources. In the Community Health Survey, participants prioritized child abuse and neglect among the top 15 priorities. In the health indicators, child abuse and neglect investigations revealed high rates of investigations in Norfolk, Virginia. In Norfolk, child abuse and neglect in completed founded investigations ranks 7.5; that’s 4.5 times higher than the state average (3.0) *rates per 1,000 children (ages 0-17 years).

“…We know other factors are poverty, lack of services, lack of education and opportunities, lack of access to prevention programs…All the factors that contribute to racism have an effect as well…Large populations of people of color in [this] region…do not have access to services.”

• Educator in a healthcare organization

While transportation is a prerequisite for all health care, Norfolk youth have barriers to accessing service and programs. In interviews, key stakeholders highlighted lack of childcare presents an obstacle for many families, interfering with their ability to access health care and services and to participate in programs. Organizations tend to operate in silos, requiring vulnerable families to locate and coordinate resources from a variety of locations, agencies and systems. Navigating these resources can be complex and confusing (page 16, CHKD: Community Health Needs Assessment 2016-2018).

Norfolk’s youth are a disparity group that experiences (1) limited availability of prevention services or (2) limited access to substance abuse prevention services and (3) worse substance use prevention outcomes. Groups include:

• Racial/ethnic disparity groups (i.e., African American, Hispanic, Immigrant),

• Geographic disparity groups (i.e., urban, no transportation), age (i.e., child/teens)

• Socioeconomic disparity groups (i.e., low income, homeless, refugees),

• Sexual identity disparity groups (LBGTQ),

• Language or literacy disparity groups (non-English speaking or low-literacy English or non-English speakers) or

• Other substantiated special populations (individuals and families experiencing hardships due to COVID-19 Coronavirus Pandemic)

How many people receive goods/services from your organization monthly on average?

HOLLA Inc. serves 10-12 families monthly on average.

What percent of your budget goes toward administrative costs/salaries?

HOLLA Inc. is operated by volunteers that do not receive payment, nor reimbursements at this time.

Has HOLLA Inc. received donations in the past?

HOLLA Inc. has not received donations in the past to benefit its programs.

What are the goals for the future?

HOLLA Inc.’s goal is to (1) to prepare competent, compassionate and committed youth leaders in local neighborhoods (2) to meet 2022 proposed budget: fundraising- $500; contributions- $500; scholarships- $1500; professional fees- $1500; community outreach- $12000;

Total $16000

HOLLA Inc. is a 501 (c)3 organization. Its main sources of income are donations.

No Time for Homelessness

“Homelessness” is the lacking of one’s own permanent housing…

The person sleeping under on the bench and the family member suffering an eviction, now sleeping on an air mattress are both homeless.

No Time for Homelessness

http://www.hollainc.net

12/1/2021

“Homelessness” is the lacking of one’s own permanent housing...

The person sleeping under on the bench and the family member suffering an eviction, now sleeping on an air mattress are both homeless.

When Archie began reaching out to addicts in our city, he himself was homeless, living in a car. He had three jobs, three kids, but he was determined not to give up. Though prevention became his passion, Archie did not feel worthy of the real title, an office, and official role in the city. He wanted to continue his work in the shadows.

Up to a third of homeless adults in the US suffer from a serious mental illness.

Born and raised in Norfolk, Archie Boone truly embodies the phrase – defying all odds. Archie was raised by a single mother in the Norview and Parkplace neighborhoods. His mother raised him to be honest and to say no to drugs, but around age 11 negative influences began creeping in. Archie turned to drugs and alcohol in part due to the influence of older cousins but also in large part because of some serious trauma they all experienced growing up.

One day in college, after passing out from drugs Archie woke up to a police officer and Dean of Students in his dorm room. Instead of arresting him, the officer counseled him. The officer told him he needed to make a change now. And just like that, cold turkey, Archie stopped using any drugs. He says it was a divine moment for him. To him, it represented God‘s mercy. And in that moment, a foundation was laid for a new life. Archie went on to become that merciful lifeline for countless people in Norfolk.

In 2016, he landed a job with the community services board. And we’re glad he did.

In Virginia, 7 in every 10,000 people are experiencing homelessness.

When Archie began working with the community services board, he was still struggling to secure stable housing. He and his wife found shelter in the home of Mark Tait, in the Heritage Point Community of Norfolk, Virginia.

In the City of Norfolk, a worker would need to earn $19.94 per hour to afford the average monthly rent of $1037.

Since 2018, Archie has afforded $1500 monthly rental payments while working a job and running multiple family businesses. His wife supports him, as well as, offers homeschooling to their three younger children- Caleb, Adam, and Abby.

In the past five years Archie has traveled the country for training on how to battle the opioid epidemic. He learned how to administer Narcan, Archie is certified in REVIVE! Overdose Prevention training in as to what many of our deputies have learned how to administer Narcan. He also gave his time at the Something In The Water Festival, looking for any one showing signs of a possible overdose. Archie also writes his own rap music to get his message out to the kids in Norfolk communities.

In 2015, the median income of renters in Norfolk was $16.05 per hour.

Archie’s income wasn’t too much higher than the 2015 median income, causing him to work more and his family seeing him less and less each day. Since black males are more likely to experience homelessness than any other population in Hampton Roads, fathers like Archie are more likely to lose their homes. And homeless men are certainly likely to part ways with their loved ones while experiencing homelessness.

Norfolk has nearly 500 more homeless men than surrounding cities in the region.

Resources are available. Learn how the City of Norfolk is increasing the readiness of Norfolk residents who are in need of opportunities to prevent eviction in the time of a pandemic.

In no state can a full-time minimum wage worker afford a one or two bedroom rental at market rate.

b. Archie’s three children are featured in his music video, “No Time.”

b. Archie now works full time with Norfolk CSB and Norfolk Prevention Coalition.

If you know anyone who may benefit, then please share.

https://www.norfolk.gov/evictionprevention

Facing Eviction? There’s help available! Norfolk Department of Neighborhood Services is hosting an Eviction Prevention Resource Clinic connecting residents to resources to pay rental and utility arrearages and assist with childcare costs. This event will be held on Saturday, December 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Attucks Theatre. All Norfolk households facing eviction are eligible to receive assistance from Legal Aid, Virginia Poverty Law Center and city staff. Breakfast, lunch and childcare will be provided to attendees at no cost, but registration is required. Event will follow COVID-19 protocols such as masks and hand sanitizer. Please bring photo ID, Social Security card, lease/rental agreement,* utility bills* and most recent paystubs.* *original, copies or digital versions are accepted.

You can find more information about this clinic and Eviction Prevention Services online or call (757) 664-RENT.

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Conceptualizing the Work- 1 of 7: Vulnerable Populations Vs. Oppressed Populations

Conceptualizing work allows one to understand the impact of the approaches used to complete the work. By conceptualizing the work, we can see how well we are working, or not. Here is one of seven “CURRENT APPROACHES” beside its replacement: “HEALTH EQUITY APPROACH”

Conceptualizing the Work-1 of 7: Vulnerable Populations Vs. Oppressed Populations

Archie Boone Jr.

http://www.hollainc.net

11/29/2021

What’s not working is the current approach of gearing up to fight for vulnerable populations, because a light has been shed in dark places, by institutions who have a direct interest in the treatment of said populations.

Sure, we have work to do!

But, what if we took a moment to conceptualize the work we have done?

Conceptualizing work allows one to understand the impact of the approaches used to complete the work. By conceptualizing the work, we can see how well we are working, or not.

Here is one of seven “CURRENT APPROACHES” beside its replacement: “HEALTH EQUITY APPROACH”

Current Approach

Vulnerable population- focus on people rather than institutions or societal factors that generate risk

What’s not working is the current gearing up to fight for vulnerable populations, because a light has been shed in dark places, by institutions who have a direct interest in the treatment of said populations. Often times, unbeknownst to many institutions, they are apart of producing community factors that generate risk. So, conceptualizing work can assist rule-followers in tightening their “moral” tool belts as to make adjustments toward utilizing health equity approaches rather their preceding approaches.

Health Equity Approach

Oppressed populations – addresses injustice in the everyday practices of institutions; systematic constraints resulting from traditions, laws, rules

What is working is what we do at work to undo what we have done that hurts oppressed populations. Let me explain. Addressing injustices in the everyday practices of institutions does not mean lawsuits, lawsuits, lawsuits. If that is what we fear, then we have already crumbled. What oppressed populations need most is access to care/treatment when their behaviors call for help. Yes, behaviors communicate needs, and if we see certain behaviors, then we can begin to position ourselves and others to anticipate specific needs of oppressed people. In this manner, competent, compassionate, caring individuals lead the charge. However, there must be a unified front and back office of administrators and policy-makers that see what is happening in the lives and communities of oppressed people. Prevention science has changed drastically, over the past 20 years, and community transformation is inevitable.

Systematic constraints resulting from traditions, laws, and rules have become the Achilles heel of many institutions that believe all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. If we believe that these truths are self-evident, then we must also work to help our institutions address laws that are inequitable and unjust, as well as rules and practices within that are “not” morally right and fair.

I wish I could say that resistance is futile, but someone might say, “I wish he would shut up already!” That, leading others to reject the thought of ever conceptualizing the work- only to have the masses remain with the current approach. And, I would be made a loner to travel the frontier of health equity approaches in a forest of oppressed people, seeking liberation. Hey guys, community health matters!

Respect.

Archie Boone Jr.

Partnerships for Success Coordinator

hollainc757@gmail.com

PREVENT OVERDOSE DEATHS | SAVE A LIFE | CARRY NALOXONE

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Half of young people who used heroin got started by abusing prescription opioids. You can save a life with naloxone.

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NALOXONE IS AN EMERGENCY MEDICINE THAT PREVENTS OVERDOSE DEATH FROM PRESCRIPTION PAINKILLERS AND HEROIN

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Don’t forget to sign up for FREE Live and Online Trainings – REVIVE! Opioid Naloxone Education & Adverse Childhood Experiences Interface.

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POWERED BY

Norfolk Prevention Coalition (NPC)

NPC’s mission to develop a comprehensive and city-wide prevention strategy and continuum of evidence based services to strength and improve outcomes for Norfolk families.

Purpose

While promoting Drug-free communities, Norfolk Prevention Coalition seeks to engage all community sectors to work together to reduce use of drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

NPC collaborates with local and regional agencies to provide prevention education on substance use and abuse to parents and other community members.

Links

Wellness Kits

https://www.norfolk.gov/FormCenter/Norfolk-Prevention-Coalition-59/Wellness-Kit-Registration-Form-514

Adult Survey Membership

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/7HYJ8R6

Youth Membership

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RVR3752

Youth Survey

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/78WDS66

Young Adult Survey (YAS)

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/6RBKCDL

Youth Survey &YAS Details

We are asking individuals between the ages of 12-25 years to share their opinions about alcohol, prescription drug misuse and heroin use. This survey is completely anonymous, and will be used to help inform prevention efforts in your community. Please text NPC to 757-434-4140 and a representative will assist you in receiving your gift.

Important Information for Respondents

• This survey is completely anonymous and does not record any personal identifying information. Please answer all questions truthfully.

• The survey is completely voluntary. You may choose not to participate at any time. You may skip any questions you are not comfortable answering.

• The information from the survey will be released in summary form only. No individual responses will be shared.

If you have any questions or concerns about the survey, please contact OMNI Institute.Support at: OMNISupport@omni.org or 303.839.9422. OMNI Institute is an organization working with coalitions across the state of Virginia to learn more about substance use among youth and young adults.

Where Do Juveniles Go After They Are Involved in Offensive Incidents Where They Can No Longer Remain in School?

Archie Lee Boone Jr.

http://www.hollainc.net

11/22/2021

…black students represented 23 percent of Virginia’s total student enrollment, they accounted for 53 percent of short-term suspensions, 60 percent of long-term suspensions, and 52 percent of expulsions…

We all know that our juvenile justice system is heavy ladened with challenges by the issue of racial and ethnic disparities. Particularly, in the disparate and disproportionate high rates of minority youth whose over representation continues to increase severely with each step away from civilized society and into the system. Youth and young adults of color make up nearly 20% of Virginia’s youth population, while accounting for more than 50 percent of all intakes, and more than 70 percent of DJJ direct care admissions.

Concurrently, we can note that racial and ethnic disparities effect citizens of our region and this can be used to raise concern and questions about the fairness of our Department of Juvenile Justice System and whether all people are receiving equal treatment under the law.

Even in the stage of prevention, these questions and concerns should be addressed because education and awareness are key to decrease the incline of the crisis of racial and ethnic disparities in systems and communities. These issues are all over our cities, counties, states, and nation.

In Virginia, the Department of Education’s Discipline, Crime and Violence report from 2014-2015 showed that while black students represented 23 percent of Virginia’s total student enrollment, they accounted for 53 percent of short-term suspensions, 60 percent of long-term suspensions, and 52 percent of expulsions.

This is a problem that is easier to identify than to solve, and one that defies easy solutions. The contributing factors are many, the issues challenging, and the people and agencies that must work together to take it on are numerous.

For these matters Norfolk Prevention Coalition intends to conduct longitudinal studies. A longitudinal study is a observational study that follows the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, in some cases from birth to death.

The use of longitudinal data in informs and shapes best practices relating to child development and social mobility (how a child moves through society).

Longitudinal data enables us to:

• Track children’s development throughout childhood and teenage years, to adulthood and beyond – including influences, aspirations and cognitive outcomes

• Study the links between family background, educational achievements and later outcomes

• Understand social mobility and the inter-generational transmission of advantage and disadvantage

• Identify drivers of socio-economic inequality and effective interventions to increase social mobility.

Moreover, we are requesting that community stakeholders join Norfolk Prevention Coalition during the “Membership Drive,” as we are recruiting members to assist with updating the community needs assessment used to address Norfolk’s public health crisis from 2015-2021.

Sign up now:

Adult Survey Membership

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/7HYJ8R6

Youth Membership

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RVR3752

Transit Network Webinar

Transportation is a prerequisite for all health care, Norfolk youth have barriers to accessing services and programs. In interviews, key stakeholders highlighted lack of childcare presents an obstacle for many families, interfering with their ability to access health care and services and to participate in programs.

Organizations tend to operate in silos, requiring vulnerable families to locate and coordinate resources from a variety of locations, agencies and systems. Navigating these resources can be complex and confusing (page 16, CHKD: Community Health Needs Assessment 2016-2018).

Norfolk team is inviting residents to an overview of the Multimodal Norfolk draft that recommends transit network and an update on the status of the multimodal transportation master plan. This webinar will include a live question and answer session where you can speak with the Multimodal Norfolk team.

Public Meetings

December 10 at 5:30 pm

December 15 at 12:00 pm

The same presentation will be given at both meetings, attend or the other.